Trump cancelled Denmark Trip because the PM won’t sell him Greenland.

President Trump and Denmark PM Mette Frederiksen .

COPENHAGEN-Danes voiced shock and disbelief on Wednesday at U.S. President Donald Trump’s cancellation of a visit to Denmark after his idea to buy Greenland was rebuffed, although Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen said she believed relations would not be affected.

Trump’s proposal at first elicited incredulity and humor from politicians in Denmark, a NATO ally of the United States, with former premier Lars Lokke Rasmussen saying: “It must be an April Fool’s Day joke.”

But the mood turned to bewilderment when Trump called off the Sept. 2-3 visit after Frederiksen called his idea of the United States purchasing Greenland, an autonomous Danish territory rich in natural resources, “absurd”.

Frederiksen, a center-left Social Democrat, said she learned of Trump’s decision “with regret and surprise”, given Denmark’s strong relations with Washington, but repeated her opposition to any Greenland transaction.

She stressed that Greenland’s premier Kim Kielsen had ruled out selling off the territory and “I obviously agree with him”.

But Frederiksen said the United States remained one of Denmark’s closest allies. “I don’t think the cancelling of this state visit should affect any decisions we make whether it is on commercial cooperation or foreign and security policies.”

Trump’s decision elicited condemnation, outrage and mockery alike among Danish opposition leaders and the public.

“So (Trump) has canceled his visit to Denmark because there was no interest in discussing selling Greenland. Is this some sort of joke? Deeply insulting to the people of Greenland and Denmark,” tweeted former premier Helle Thorning Schmidt.

“Total chaos with @realDonaldTrump and cancellation of state visit to Denmark. It has gone from a big opportunity for strengthened dialogue between allies to a diplomatic crisis,” said ex-foreign minister Kristian Jensen of the Liberal Party.

Last week, the Wall Street Journal reported that President Trump had, on various occasions, floated the idea of the U.S. purchasing Greenland. Trump later confirmed his interest, saying “essentially, it’s a large real estate deal” and jokingly tweeting a doctored image of a Trump-branded building towering over the barren Greenland landscape.

Greenland is a massive yet sparsely populated island off the northeast coast of Canada that’s largely covered in ice. The island is a self-governing territory of Denmark.

In response to reports of American interest, Greenland’s Foreign Ministry said it was “open for business, not for sale.” Denmark’s prime minister called the idea “absurd.”

Trump is not the first U.S. president to try to buy Greenland. The Truman administration offered the Danes $100 million in gold and potentially part of Alaska for the island in 1946. Denmark declined, but has allowed the U.S. to maintain an Air Force base there for the past 70 years. The two countries completed a deal in 1917 for America to acquire what are now the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Many wrote off the idea as nothing more than offhand comments made by a president prone to speaking off the cuff. Others have argued that the notion was functionally impossible because Denmark may not be in a position to sell Greenland, even if it wanted to.

Purchasing Greenland might not be as unreasonable as it sounds, some have countered, and such a transaction would not be unprecedented. America has a long history of buying huge swaths of land, including Alaska and most of the central U.S. Supporters of the idea say Greenland has strong strategic military value. The island also has major oil and mineral resources that are expected to become accessible as its ice sheets melt due to climate change. Denmark may also want to redirect the $740 million it spends annually to support the island.

Judicial officers trained on usage of revised Gender-Based Violence manual.

A cross-section of Judicial Officers is taking part in a three-day training on the use of the revised Gender-Based Violence manual.

The training was opened by Justice Damalie N. Lwanga, the Executive Director Judicial Training Institute (JTI), who documented the impact of gender-based violence. “Gender-based violence is an abuse of human rights that continues to plague this country with adverse effects on the victims’ physical and mental health/ emotional feelings, livelihood and on the economy.”

She added that it affects child growth, development and welfare resulting in loss of lives. “We, therefore, need to ensure that the laws relating to gender-based violence are implemented.”

At least 30 participants including Judges, representatives from CEDOVIP, JLOS and DPP are being trained as trainers.

Justice Lwanga commended Centre for Domestic Violence Prevention (CEDOVIP), UN Women, H/W Jackline Kagoya and H/W Christine Nantege and Lisa Churcher, from the Australia Family Court, for reviewing the Training manual.

The training has been organised by the JTI in partnership with UN Women and CEDOVIP.

The Judge emphasized that cases of gender-based violence must be handled efficiently and effectively in the justice system in order to give hope and confidence to the population.

The UN Women Representative, Ms. Beatrice Mulindwa, said the training would equip and build the capacity of the participants with training skills, particularly in gender-based violence.

She urged the JTI to reflect on the need to have a pool of trainers on gender equality and GBV who can always be called upon to conduct the trainings.

Ms. Tina Musuya, the Executive Director of CEDOVIP advised on the need to formalise and standardize the trainings.

“It is also important that the partners in civil society know about this manual so that if they are coming in with resources then they should closely work with the Institute to roll out the training,” she said.

The training is facilitated by Justice Prof. Lillian Tibatemwa, Justice David Batema, H/W Jackline Kagoya, H/W Christine Nantege, Ms Lisa Churcher a consultant and Mr. Paul Bbuibwa from CEDOVIP among others.

Among the topics discussed are; introduction to Gender-based violence, GBV causes and concepts, manifestations of Gender-based violence, international, regional and domestic framework, Uganda Legal Framework overview among others.

CDF General Muhoozi applauds UPDF troops, 529 return from Somalia.

The Chief of Defence Forces (CDF) of the Uganda Peoples’ Defence Forces (UPDF), General David Muhoozi on Friday 16 welcomed back 529 UPDF troops who were part of the fifth United Nation Guard Unit in Somalia and another 1,406 troops of Uganda’s 25th Battle Group to Somalia.

The function was held at the UPDF Peace Support Operations and Training Center in Nakaseke District.

General Muhoozi commended the troops for raising the Ugandan flag high in the foreign missions from where they have just returned after serving for one year.

He said Africa is still faced with many challenges that Africans must strive to resolve as united people.

“It is in this spirit that we went to Somalia; extending a liberation struggle of Africa. A stable Somalia is a stable Africa,” Gen Muhoozi said.

The General noted that Somalia is not very far away from any African country and what affects any country affects all African countries.

He said the African Union intervention in Somalia was a wise undertaking that has positively paid off.

“We are now counting successes in Somalia due to the selfless contribution made by you and your predecessors towards the betterment of the situation in the Horn of Africa.

Thank you for having Africa at heart,” said Gen Muhoozi, adding that despite challenges such as delayed payment of mission allowances due to circumstances beyond UPDF control, the troops have maintained their pan African spirit and remained focused on their duty.

The Commander Land Forces, Lt Gen Peter Elwelu, revealed to the troops a plan to deploy some of them to command and nurture the recently recruited local defence forces.

The troops received a month of post-mission counseling and training in Somalia prior to their return home and another two weeks on arrival at PSO Training Centre. The counselling and training were officially closed today in the same ceremony to receive the troops.

The CDF granted the troops 45 days to rest and recuperate.

The UPDF recently deployed its sixth UNGU to secure the UN Mission in Somalia and the twenty-eighth battle group under the African Union Mission in Somalia. The first battlegroup was deployed in 2007 and UNGU in 2014. Uganda’s UNGU deployment followed the need to secure the UN Mission in Somalia when it shifted its offices from Nairobi to Mogadishu.

Message from president Mr. Museveni to Ugandans especially the( Bazzukulu).

To all Ugandans, especially the Bazzukulu

Greetings. I have concluded my countrywide tour of the 20 zones. My idea of using these 20 zones for sensitization comes from the 19 Independence Districts, which themselves had grown out of the 15 colonial districts. The colonial districts were: West Nile; Acholi; Lango; Karamoja; Teso; Bugisu; Bukedi; Busoga; Mengo; Mubende; Masaka; Ankole; Kigyezi; Tooro; and Bunyoro.

This is according to a clockwise movement from West Nile.

At independence, on account of the cultural and linguistic considerations, four new Districts were created. These were: Madi out of West Nile; Sebei out of Bugisu; Kasese out of Tooro; and Bundibugyo (Bwamba) out of Tooro. This brought the total to 19. Kasese and Bundibugyo were created during Amin’s time, responding to the resistance by the Bakonjo and Baamba to the mistakes of the managers of the Tooro kingdom, before the abolition of the kingdoms in 1967. During the NRM time, in addition to further decentralization for ease of service delivery, we also created the Kampala zone out of the colonial Mengo district. Hence, the total of 20 zones. During this sensitization campaign, my staff handled Kampala with Wakiso, out of the former Mengo district.

These 20 zones are convenient for communication on account of the dialects used. In each zone, I either speak in English or in the local dialect if I have good command of it and there is only one translation for most of the zones. However, in a few, we are forced to have multiple translations. In, for instance, West Nile, we must have translations into Lugbara, Alur and Kakwa. In Bukedi, we must have translations into Lugwere, Japadhola, Ateso, Samia and Lunyole. In some areas, like West Nile and Bukedi, I use Swahili.

On this tour, my message was, again, to continue to assault the bottleneck of the archaic tradition of subsistence farming – okukolera olubuto lwokka, okukorera enda yoonka, erikolera erirya riisa, tic me cam keken,aisoamaikin akoik) etc. etc.

In the pre-colonial, pre- capitalist times, Ugandans mainly worked for food, ensuring simple shelter such as the traditional huts (ebifuuha), collecting firewood (okusheenya), collecting water from the well (okutaha amaizi, okussena amazzi), raising cattle or goats for bride price, using cattle or goats to come to the help of a friend in need (munno mu kabi, kushumbuusha), using cattle or goats for empaano (friendship gifts) and using goods (ghee, hoes, pangas, bark-cloth etc.) for barter-trade (okuchurika).

There was very little use of money and families or communities were self-sufficient but at a low – level of technology, as seen above. The families would build their own houses etc, because, technologically, it was possible to democratize the skills of house -building. However, even at that time, the need for specialization (emyooga) was becoming clear. While everybody, together with family members and neighbours, could build the traditional huts, not everybody could be a blacksmith (omuheesi); not everybody could be a mubaizi (carpenter); not everybody could be a munogoozi (clay workers -potters); not everybody could be a mukomagyi (bark-cloth maker); not everybody could be Omutanagyi (the maker of bows and arrows); not everybody could be a omuriimbi (lake men – that operated canoes or rafts – ebiba); etc. etc.

Therefore, even in the pre-capitalist, pre – colonial times, specialization had started. You did not have to do everything that you needed for life yourself. You only needed to have the means to barter or buy for everything you needed. They were using cowrie-shells (ensimbi) as currency.

With colonialism, in some isolated instances, technology advanced. More sophisticated houses, using cement, steel bars (mitayimbwa), mabaati, matafaari (bricks), mategura (tiles) etc., were introduced. That meant that not everybody could be a builder. It is the civil engineers, the brick-layers etc. that could build those modern houses. The rest of us, therefore, had to have enough money to pay the specialists to build the modern houses for us. While it is still easy for almost everybody that can walk to go to the well and collect water, or go to the forest and collect fire-wood, it is neither convenient nor efficient. It is more convenient to use gas or electricity for lighting and cooking and to have the National Water and Sewerage Co-operation to bring water to us through pipes and take away sewerage through other pipes. We no longer have bachuura – the people that would come at night in towns to take away people’s faeces that had been deposited in buckets (obulobo). The bucket system in the pre-modern towns all over the world was, of course, some sort of improvement on the open- defecation that was common in villages – just easing oneself in the bushes.

Therefore, with modernity where you no longer build your own house etc., the need for money is accentuated.

You need money for a good house; you need money for some of the foods (sugar, coffee, tea, meat, salt etc.) even when you grow your own food; you need money for the education of the children that do not get Government bursary; you need money for the household non-food needs (clothes, furniture, etc.); you need money for clean water( piped or not); you need money for electricity; you need money to buy a modern means of transport (pikipiki, car, etc.); etc., etc.

Therefore, the traditional way, where you only work for the stomach (subsistence farming), is a disaster for the African families. Subsistence farming in the modern times is like a fish out of water. It cannot survive. It is out of place and in danger.

During the colonial times, the traditional mainly non-money economy had a modest change that mutated it into an “enclave economy”. “An enclave economy” means an island of pseudo – modernity surrounded by a sea of backwardness. The Island of pseudo – modernity was comprised of the 3Cs and 3Ts, as the colonialists themselves described it.

The 3Cs stood for: Coffee, Cotton and Copper; the 3Ts stood for: Tea, Tobacco and Tourism. These represented a very small proportion of the Ugandan families. In Ankole, for instance, only a few families in Ndeija grew coffee and maybe some in the Igara – Sheema area and some families in the Kyamuhunga area grew tea. Certainly, in the two parishes of Kikoni and Nyaburiza in Ntungamo Sub-County, I do not remember anybody (any family) that was engaged in cash-crop growing. They were all, democratically, working for the stomach only. It could be that some coffee farmers in the Buganda area got some reasonable money from coffee. There were a number of good permanent buildings in that area. That must have been on account of getting good money from coffee, most likely. In Northern and Eastern Uganda, where the main colonial cash-crop was cotton, there was some progress especially in paying for education, buying bicycles etc.

However, housing remained mainly the traditional grass-thatched houses. Why? Was it because the people did not want better houses, or was it because the money from cotton was not enough to cover the education costs and improved housing? In 1969 when I made a personally sponsored study tour of the Northern Uganda, some women in Arua town were still walking around with only leaves tied around their waist but, otherwise, totally naked; at Kalongo Hospital, I found about 50 women, waiting to deliver, in the courtyard of the Hospital, all bare – breasted. I do not have to talk of Karamoja because for that area, there was no attempt to introduce any cash crop at all.

With coffee, you can make good money even in a small acreage. With cotton, you can only make money if you have a big acreage. In the North and East, in those years, the populations were still small, and, therefore, the land could not have been the problem. What, then, was the problem? Why were people not building better houses? In the Ankole area, the people were staying in grass-thatched huts because there was no cash-crop production- no coffee, no cotton, no dairy industry, no serious beef industry beyond the monthly cattle auction markets that, again, only catered, where the parents were enlightened enough, for school fees, like in my family’s case. By 1954, I can only remember 3 mabaati-roofed houses in the two parishes of Kikoni and Nyaburiza – two belonged to local colonial chiefs and one belonged to a trader. Apart from the mabaati roofs, the three lonely houses were made of the flimsy wattle, reeds and mud walls (emuli- emiingo and ebikondo). The bricks or the Cement blocs were unheard of. Yet, many families had a lot of land, cattle, big banana plantations etc. It was, however, all for, mainly, traditional purposes of subsistence – erikolera erirya riisa, okukolera ekidda kyonka, okukolera olubuto lwokka, okukorera enda yoonka, tic me cam keken, aisoamakin akoik.

Therefore, by independence, there were two social-economic problems for the population of Uganda: Continued living under the social formation of primitive self – sufficiency at low technological and organizational levels and where cash crops had been introduced, engaging in cash crops for the benefit of the colonial industries such as the textile factories of Manchester in the U.K but without taking the homestead economics as the primary factor. The primary factor, should be to make the family rich and not just the factories rich. Therefore, by independence, many families had no source of sustained cash and the ones that had some sustained sources, the amounts were small except, probably, for coffee.

In comes Idi Amin in 1971. He destroys, almost completely, the small modern economy, the cash economy of the 3Cs and 3Ts. Cotton and copper disappeared completely. It is only coffee that continued to limp on at 2 million, 60kgs bags per annum. Tea declined from 23million kgs per year to only 3million kgs per year. Tourism disappeared. Tobacco continued to limp on but with reduced volumes. By 1986, therefore, when the NRM finally came to power, the economy of Uganda had become more subsistence than it had been in 1971 but, of course, with a bigger population.

This is where the NRM played a decisive role in reviving and propelling forward the economy of Uganda. First, we had to bring back the small “enclave economy”, the small island of modernity surrounded by the sea of backwardness. Tea has gone from the 3 million kgs of 1986, passed the 23 million kgs of 1971 and is now at 60 million kgs. Coffee has gone from the 2.392million bags in FY 1985/86 to 4.305.million bags FY 2017/18. Even cotton has gone from almost zero in 1986 to now 189,444 bales in FY 2018/19. Tobacco is still being produced and in FY 2017/18 Uganda exported 21,393 tonnes. Tourism has grown by leaps and bounds from the 16,950 of 1968 and the almost zero numbers of 1986 to now 1.5million tourists bringing in US$1.5bn per annum. It can and will grow more. Of the original 3Cs and 3Ts, therefore, it is only copper that has not yet been revived.

In addition to reviving the 2Cs and the 3Ts, the NRM has successfully commercialized many completely new products as follows: maize, milk and milk products, beef, fish, timber, bananas, fruit, cocoa, vanilla, palm oil, flowers, sim-sim, sun-flower, cassava, etc. etc. All these are agro-based with factories being fed by them. Many of these agricultural products have been transformed by factories into final products: textiles from cotton, fish products, cooking oils and soaps from palm trees and sun-flower, plywood from timber, juices from fruits, starch from cassava, powdered milk and other dairy products from milk, tyres from rubber, etc.etc. There are other factories that are not based on agricultural products. These are: cement from limestone (einooni); plastics from oil; steel products from scrap and now from iron ore (obutare); fertilizers from phosphates; gold bars from gold ores; batteries from recycled batteries; etc.etc. Some of the factories use imported raw-materials such as PVC.

This spectrum of the sources of the raw-materials – agricultural, forest, fresh water, minerals or imported, as well as the peaceful atmosphere, has already attracted a total of 4,900 factories employing a total of 700,000 workers. Therefore, sector one, commercial agriculture, is already linked with sector two – industries – in some significant ways. Also mining, to a limited extent, is also getting linked to industry.

Then, there is the services sector comprised of the hotels, transport, banking, insurance etc. with a total of 200,000 companies, employing 1.5m persons. This is sector III.

Finally, there is the ICT Sector with 1,200 companies employing a total of about 10,000 persons. These ICT companies include companies like Techobrain, iSON Technology which do BPO operations which involve, among others, linking businesses across the World.

Therefore, the Ugandan economy is one of the fastest growing in the World on account of the NRA/UPDF ensuring peace, the NRM ensuring reconciliation and democratic empowerment of the Ugandans, the NRM ensuring macro-economic stability as well as the NRM ensuring some limited infrastructure rehabilitation and development. It would have grown faster if the 6th Parliament had not delayed the construction of Bujagali dam and if we did not have corrupt actors asking for bribes before delivering services or those corrupt officials doing shoddy jobs and inflating costs. The corruption issue, however, is a software issue and not a hardware one. Given our transparent democratic system, the corrupt always get exposed and, on account of our massive educational system, nobody is indispensable.

In 2006, I put my foot down with the 7th Parliament and we prioritized the roads, defence, electricity, health, education and ICT. With adequate electricity, the economy will roar.

There is, however, one structural problem in the society and that is the residual pre-capitalist phenomenon of subsistence farming (okukolera olubutto lwokka, okukolera enda yoonka, okukolera ekidda kyonka, erikolera erirya rissa, tic me cam keken, aisoamaikin akoik) already mentioned above. It is this continued disabling factor that I have been battling eversince 1966 after my A levels. Tropical Africa is very deceptive and dangerous for those that do not sharpen their insight. The good climate means that even the lazy can survive. I used to see two madmen in Ntungamo – Katukuuza and Kaboogyi. They would go round completely naked but they would not die immediately. In the cold climates, you cannot survive like that. In the Tropics, you die slowly and without drama. By not dying dramatically, however, it does not mean that the Ugandans’ quality of life is good; not at all. How do we measure this? We have a number of measurements such as: the infant mortality rate; the average life-expectancy; the percentage of people with stunted growth; etc.etc. Infant mortality rate in Uganda was 122 per every 1,000 infants born alive in 1986. It has now fallen to 43 per every 1,000 infants born alive within the 1st year of life. In Sweden, however, the infant mortality rate is 3 in every 1,000. The average life expectancy in Uganda was 43 years in 1986. It is now 63 years. In Japan, however, it is 86 years. In Finland it is 81 years. Therefore, this abstaining from modernisation has got a cost to the society. Yet, some people refuse to see this.

You get religious people preaching on how “God has called” the deceased. My question is always: “Why does God like to call Africans more than calling the other people e.g. Japanese?” It is not God calling Africans; It is Satan calling them on account of the Africans failing to use the “talents” (in the Book of Mathew 25: 14-30) God gave them.

This inadequate quality of life is on account, in part, to the 68% of our people refusing to get out of the tradition of only producing for the stomach. It is the failure of the leaders that live near these people, to tell them how to improve their lives by going commercial in their production efforts. In 1966, when we confronted the phenomenon of the stagnation of the Banyankore Society, we proposed 4 steps to be taken: step one – stop nomadism. The Banyankore, like the Karimojong, had that additional problem of nomadism that I analysed in the Booklet: “From Obwiriza (grass thatch) to Matafaari”, which captured that campaign. As a result of that campaign, the Banyankore settled down and started fencing their lands and doing semi-modern animal husbandry.

Unfortunately, Amin came in, in 1971 and we had to embark on fighting that lasted 16 years, until 1986.

When I came back in 1986, I found many of the Banyankore settled but still in the phenomenon of only working for the stomach. After some detailed analysis, I proposed 3 steps. Step one, go out of only producing for the stomach and also produce for the pocket (money). Step two, as you work for money, do so with ekibaro (cura, aimair, otita). Step three, once the families have started earning incomes, the new danger is when the head of the family dies and, then, the children descend on the property and destroy it by fragmentation, just like white ants. In step three, we, therefore, de-campaigned inheritance by fragmentation and recommended inheritance by shares (emigabo). In this way, we divide what comes from the property, surplus income, rather than dividing the property. In that way, what the late property owner left will be preserved and it will produce new companies for each of the descendants of the late owner.

On the issue of cura (ekibaro), our recommendation is that for somebody of four acres or less, the following activities are recommended:

Coffee;

Fruits (oranges, mangoes, pineapples, grapes,

apples, straw-berries);

Food-crops;

Pasture for dairy;

Poultry farming for eggs in the backyard;

Piggery in the backyard;

Fish-farming in the periphery of the wetlands

(emiiga), but not in the centre of the wetlands.

Therefore, the aim of my recent campaign is to wake up the sleeping 68% portion of our homesteads to join the transformation efforts. If each of the 8million homesteads of Uganda earned Shs.20million per year, that effort would add an extra US$44bn to our economy. The size of the economy would, therefore, jump to US$74bn by the foreign exchange rate method.

In 1966, before we started the anti-subsistence farming campaign, I had some disagreement with the Banyankore elite. Their view was that the traditional Banyankore could not change. They were “impossible” (tibarikubasika). My question, then, was: “What, then, should we do?” Their answer was: “Obarugyeho”; “okore abyaawe” (“leave them alone; do your own personal things”). I could not believe in this line because I was living with my mother, originally a traditional woman herself, but who had been transformed by the limited Church efforts and oburokore (being saved). She had learnt the hygienic practices of boiling milk instead of drinking it raw; she taught us to abandon the unhygienic Banyankore practice of eating from the same big plate (orusaniya) or a heat – treated (kubabura) banana leaf (olulagala, orureere) in favour of each individual having his own plate, his own cup, his own kyanzi (milk – pot). She had learnt the knitting of sweaters. She could even read the Bible. This was all influence by the two self -sponsored six months’ courses each of oburoonde (baptism and confirmation courses) which, at personal expense and staying with the Katungyis (family friends of my grand-parents), “abroad” at Kinoni (25 miles from Ntungamo). All this was in addition to the great personal discipline of no alcohol, no smoking (okureetsa), no kikaambi (chewing tobacco), no loose living etc. I, therefore, believed that the Banyankore could change; but we had to undertake the efforts. Besides, we had to try.

Recently, I was in the Sub-county of Kanyaryeru. 70% of the homesteads have food security and are in commercial farming with good ekibaro (cura, otita, aimar) of dairy and bananas. In the 9 Villages around Kisozi, the percentage is 85% for the 1,997 homesteads.

How do the 68% move forward, following the present campaign? My answer is that there are already four funds for Wealth and Job creation. These are: the Operation Wealth Creation (OWC) Fund; the Women Fund; the Youth Fund; the Micro-finance fund and the Innovation Fund. This is a total of Shs437.2bn. This money has been there every year, in some cases, even since the year 2001 as NAADS money. The complaints are now that, this money is given to the ones “who already have”. The have-nots do not get. It is the “haves” that access this support. This cannot be a big problem. The big issue is that the money is there. If the routes through which it is passing have a problem, then we shall get better routes.

Besides, we shall add an additional 3 funds: the value addition fund for the 20 zones depending on the locally available raw-materials; the myooga funds; and the leaders’ SACCO fund. We have already supported the youth of Kampala, Rukungiri etc. with metal cutting and bending common-user machine tools, the common-user machines for carpentry etc. We supported some youth with grain-milling and animal feeds’ mixing machines. We are now to aim at the whole spectrum of value addition, area by area. The immediate industry I am about to launch is leather – tanning at Kawumu, Luwero, using the skins of the meat-packers so that Uganda is self-sufficient in leather for shoe-making, making leather-bags, making leather-covered car-seats etc. We shall, then, target the whole spectrum of industries.

There are, then, the myooga. Omwooga (singular) emyooga (plural) are Runyankore words meaning a specialization sector (blacksmithing, carpentry, pottery etc.). We identified the following myooga:

Boda Boda Association;

Women Entrepreneurs’ Association;

Carpenters’ Association;

Salon Operators’ Association;

Taxi Operators’ Association;

Restaurant Association;

Welders’ Association;

Market Vendors’ Association;

Youth Leaders’ SACCO;

PWDs’ Association;

Produce Dealers’ Association;

Mechanics’ Association;

Tailors’ Association;

Media Operators’ Association;

Fishermen’s Association;

The Performing Arts’ Association.

Each of these will have a district-wide SACCO with branches at convenient points (Parish or Sub-county).

These mwooga – specific and district-wide SACCOs may be better than the katogo (mixed grill) ones that were, moreover, numerous and not covering specific geographic areas. These myooga SACCOs will cover all the miscellaneous activities that are not agriculture. Agriculture is still being covered by OWC and Uganda Development Bank (UDB), the latter for the rich. These myooga SACCOs will also cover some of the social groups: Women, Youth leaders, PWDs and some are suggesting the Elders.

The final and also district-wide will be for the elected leaders of the Local Government or the political Parties. Many of these either get no pay or low pay. Yet, they are not allowed to access the other Wealth funds on the grounds that they are leaders. This is not fair, especially, since they use their time for the benefit of the community and, sometimes, they do not have enough time for their own affairs. The leaders SACCO will fill this gap and they should remain members even when they retire.

All this is choo (waking up) from working for the stomach only (tic me cam keken) using Government money. The people of the parish of Rwengaaju, Kabarole, however, demonstrated that you did not have to wait for Government money. As soon as they got my message in the year 2008, they formed their SACCO and raised money from among themselves starting with Shs.3million from 60 members. You can, on this, contact Mr. Richard Nyakana on telephone who is the leader of these farmers and other wealth creation warriors.

I invite all of you to join in this sensitization effort so that our society is transformed. We cannot go on with a society that still accommodates irrational archaic practices in the modern times when the Americans are celebrating 50 years of going to the moon and coming back. It is suicidal.

I thank you.

Yoweri K. Museveni (Gen. Rtd.)

PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF UGANDA

6th August, 2019

To all Ugandans, especially the Buzzukulu

Greetings. I have concluded my countrywide tour of the 20 zones. My idea of using these 20 zones for sensitization comes from the 19 Independence Districts, which themselves had grown out of the 15 colonial districts. The colonial districts were: West Nile; Acholi; Lango; Karamoja; Teso; Bugisu; Bukedi; Busoga; Mengo; Mubende; Masaka; Ankole; Kigyezi; Tooro; and Bunyoro.

This is according to a clockwise movement from West Nile.

At independence, on account of the cultural and linguistic considerations, four new Districts were created. These were: Madi out of West Nile; Sebei out of Bugisu; Kasese out of Tooro; and Bundibugyo (Bwamba) out of Tooro. This brought the total to 19. Kasese and Bundibugyo were created during Amin’s time, responding to the resistance by the Bakonjo and Baamba to the mistakes of the managers of the Tooro kingdom, before the abolition of the kingdoms in 1967. During the NRM time, in addition to further decentralization for ease of service delivery, we also created the Kampala zone out of the colonial Mengo district. Hence, the total of 20 zones. During this sensitization campaign, my staff handled Kampala with Wakiso, out of the former Mengo district.

These 20 zones are convenient for communication on account of the dialects used. In each zone, I either speak in English or in the local dialect if I have good command of it and there is only one translation for most of the zones. However, in a few, we are forced to have multiple translations. In, for instance, West Nile, we must have translations into Lugbara, Alur and Kakwa. In Bukedi, we must have translations into Lugwere, Japadhola, Ateso, Samia and Lunyole. In some areas, like West Nile and Bukedi, I use Swahili.

On this tour, my message was, again, to continue to assault the bottleneck of the archaic tradition of subsistence farming – okukolera olubuto lwokka, okukorera enda yoonka, erikolera erirya riisa, tic me cam keken,aisoamaikin akoik) etc. etc.

In the pre-colonial, pre- capitalist times, Ugandans mainly worked for food, ensuring simple shelter such as the traditional huts (ebifuuha), collecting firewood (okusheenya), collecting water from the well (okutaha amaizi, okussena amazzi), raising cattle or goats for bride price, using cattle or goats to come to the help of a friend in need (munno mu kabi, kushumbuusha), using cattle or goats for empaano (friendship gifts) and using goods (ghee, hoes, pangas, bark-cloth etc.) for barter-trade (okuchurika).

There was very little use of money and families or communities were self-sufficient but at a low – level of technology, as seen above. The families would build their own houses etc, because, technologically, it was possible to democratize the skills of house -building. However, even at that time, the need for specialization (emyooga) was becoming clear. While everybody, together with family members and neighbours, could build the traditional huts, not everybody could be a blacksmith (omuheesi); not everybody could be a mubaizi (carpenter); not everybody could be a munogoozi (clay workers -potters); not everybody could be a mukomagyi (bark-cloth maker); not everybody could be Omutanagyi (the maker of bows and arrows); not everybody could be a omuriimbi (lake men – that operated canoes or rafts – ebiba); etc. etc.

Therefore, even in the pre-capitalist, pre – colonial times, specialization had started. You did not have to do everything that you needed for life yourself. You only needed to have the means to barter or buy for everything you needed. They were using cowrie-shells (ensimbi) as currency.

With colonialism, in some isolated instances, technology advanced. More sophisticated houses, using cement, steel bars (mitayimbwa), mabaati, matafaari (bricks), mategura (tiles) etc., were introduced. That meant that not everybody could be a builder. It is the civil engineers, the brick-layers etc. that could build those modern houses. The rest of us, therefore, had to have enough money to pay the specialists to build the modern houses for us. While it is still easy for almost everybody that can walk to go to the well and collect water, or go to the forest and collect fire-wood, it is neither convenient nor efficient. It is more convenient to use gas or electricity for lighting and cooking and to have the National Water and Sewerage Co-operation to bring water to us through pipes and take away sewerage through other pipes. We no longer have bachuura – the people that would come at night in towns to take away people’s faeces that had been deposited in buckets (obulobo). The bucket system in the pre-modern towns all over the world was, of course, some sort of improvement on the open- defecation that was common in villages – just easing oneself in the bushes.

Therefore, with modernity where you no longer build your own house etc., the need for money is accentuated.

You need money for a good house; you need money for some of the foods (sugar, coffee, tea, meat, salt etc.) even when you grow your own food; you need money for the education of the children that do not get Government bursary; you need money for the household non-food needs (clothes, furniture, etc.); you need money for clean water( piped or not); you need money for electricity; you need money to buy a modern means of transport (pikipiki, car, etc.); etc., etc.

Therefore, the traditional way, where you only work for the stomach (subsistence farming), is a disaster for the African families. Subsistence farming in the modern times is like a fish out of water. It cannot survive. It is out of place and in danger.

During the colonial times, the traditional mainly non-money economy had a modest change that mutated it into an “enclave economy”. “An enclave economy” means an island of pseudo – modernity surrounded by a sea of backwardness. The Island of pseudo – modernity was comprised of the 3Cs and 3Ts, as the colonialists themselves described it.

The 3Cs stood for: Coffee, Cotton and Copper; the 3Ts stood for: Tea, Tobacco and Tourism. These represented a very small proportion of the Ugandan families. In Ankole, for instance, only a few families in Ndeija grew coffee and maybe some in the Igara – Sheema area and some families in the Kyamuhunga area grew tea. Certainly, in the two parishes of Kikoni and Nyaburiza in Ntungamo Sub-County, I do not remember anybody (any family) that was engaged in cash-crop growing. They were all, democratically, working for the stomach only. It could be that some coffee farmers in the Buganda area got some reasonable money from coffee. There were a number of good permanent buildings in that area. That must have been on account of getting good money from coffee, most likely. In Northern and Eastern Uganda, where the main colonial cash-crop was cotton, there was some progress especially in paying for education, buying bicycles etc.

However, housing remained mainly the traditional grass-thatched houses. Why? Was it because the people did not want better houses, or was it because the money from cotton was not enough to cover the education costs and improved housing? In 1969 when I made a personally sponsored study tour of the Northern Uganda, some women in Arua town were still walking around with only leaves tied around their waist but, otherwise, totally naked; at Kalongo Hospital, I found about 50 women, waiting to deliver, in the courtyard of the Hospital, all bare – breasted. I do not have to talk of Karamoja because for that area, there was no attempt to introduce any cash crop at all.

With coffee, you can make good money even in a small acreage. With cotton, you can only make money if you have a big acreage. In the North and East, in those years, the populations were still small, and, therefore, the land could not have been the problem. What, then, was the problem? Why were people not building better houses? In the Ankole area, the people were staying in grass-thatched huts because there was no cash-crop production- no coffee, no cotton, no dairy industry, no serious beef industry beyond the monthly cattle auction markets that, again, only catered, where the parents were enlightened enough, for school fees, like in my family’s case. By 1954, I can only remember 3 mabaati-roofed houses in the two parishes of Kikoni and Nyaburiza – two belonged to local colonial chiefs and one belonged to a trader. Apart from the mabaati roofs, the three lonely houses were made of the flimsy wattle, reeds and mud walls (emuli- emiingo and ebikondo). The bricks or the Cement blocs were unheard of. Yet, many families had a lot of land, cattle, big banana plantations etc. It was, however, all for, mainly, traditional purposes of subsistence – erikolera erirya riisa, okukolera ekidda kyonka, okukolera olubuto lwokka, okukorera enda yoonka, tic me cam keken, aisoamakin akoik.

Therefore, by independence, there were two social-economic problems for the population of Uganda: Continued living under the social formation of primitive self – sufficiency at low technological and organizational levels and where cash crops had been introduced, engaging in cash crops for the benefit of the colonial industries such as the textile factories of Manchester in the U.K but without taking the homestead economics as the primary factor. The primary factor, should be to make the family rich and not just the factories rich. Therefore, by independence, many families had no source of sustained cash and the ones that had some sustained sources, the amounts were small except, probably, for coffee.

In comes Idi Amin in 1971. He destroys, almost completely, the small modern economy, the cash economy of the 3Cs and 3Ts. Cotton and copper disappeared completely. It is only coffee that continued to limp on at 2 million, 60kgs bags per annum. Tea declined from 23million kgs per year to only 3million kgs per year. Tourism disappeared. Tobacco continued to limp on but with reduced volumes. By 1986, therefore, when the NRM finally came to power, the economy of Uganda had become more subsistence than it had been in 1971 but, of course, with a bigger population.

This is where the NRM played a decisive role in reviving and propelling forward the economy of Uganda. First, we had to bring back the small “enclave economy”, the small island of modernity surrounded by the sea of backwardness. Tea has gone from the 3 million kgs of 1986, passed the 23 million kgs of 1971 and is now at 60 million kgs. Coffee has gone from the 2.392million bags in FY 1985/86 to 4.305.million bags FY 2017/18. Even cotton has gone from almost zero in 1986 to now 189,444 bales in FY 2018/19. Tobacco is still being produced and in FY 2017/18 Uganda exported 21,393 tonnes. Tourism has grown by leaps and bounds from the 16,950 of 1968 and the almost zero numbers of 1986 to now 1.5million tourists bringing in US$1.5bn per annum. It can and will grow more. Of the original 3Cs and 3Ts, therefore, it is only copper that has not yet been revived.

In addition to reviving the 2Cs and the 3Ts, the NRM has successfully commercialized many completely new products as follows: maize, milk and milk products, beef, fish, timber, bananas, fruit, cocoa, vanilla, palm oil, flowers, sim-sim, sun-flower, cassava, etc. etc. All these are agro-based with factories being fed by them. Many of these agricultural products have been transformed by factories into final products: textiles from cotton, fish products, cooking oils and soaps from palm trees and sun-flower, plywood from timber, juices from fruits, starch from cassava, powdered milk and other dairy products from milk, tyres from rubber, etc.etc. There are other factories that are not based on agricultural products. These are: cement from limestone (einooni); plastics from oil; steel products from scrap and now from iron ore (obutare); fertilizers from phosphates; gold bars from gold ores; batteries from recycled batteries; etc.etc. Some of the factories use imported raw-materials such as PVC.

This spectrum of the sources of the raw-materials – agricultural, forest, fresh water, minerals or imported, as well as the peaceful atmosphere, has already attracted a total of 4,900 factories employing a total of 700,000 workers. Therefore, sector one, commercial agriculture, is already linked with sector two – industries – in some significant ways. Also mining, to a limited extent, is also getting linked to industry.

Then, there is the services sector comprised of the hotels, transport, banking, insurance etc. with a total of 200,000 companies, employing 1.5m persons. This is sector III.

Finally, there is the ICT Sector with 1,200 companies employing a total of about 10,000 persons. These ICT companies include companies like Techobrain, iSON Technology which do BPO operations which involve, among others, linking businesses across the World.

Therefore, the Ugandan economy is one of the fastest growing in the World on account of the NRA/UPDF ensuring peace, the NRM ensuring reconciliation and democratic empowerment of the Ugandans, the NRM ensuring macro-economic stability as well as the NRM ensuring some limited infrastructure rehabilitation and development. It would have grown faster if the 6th Parliament had not delayed the construction of Bujagali dam and if we did not have corrupt actors asking for bribes before delivering services or those corrupt officials doing shoddy jobs and inflating costs. The corruption issue, however, is a software issue and not a hardware one. Given our transparent democratic system, the corrupt always get exposed and, on account of our massive educational system, nobody is indispensable.

In 2006, I put my foot down with the 7th Parliament and we prioritized the roads, defence, electricity, health, education and ICT. With adequate electricity, the economy will roar.

There is, however, one structural problem in the society and that is the residual pre-capitalist phenomenon of subsistence farming (okukolera olubutto lwokka, okukolera enda yoonka, okukolera ekidda kyonka, erikolera erirya rissa, tic me cam keken, aisoamaikin akoik) already mentioned above. It is this continued disabling factor that I have been battling eversince 1966 after my A levels. Tropical Africa is very deceptive and dangerous for those that do not sharpen their insight. The good climate means that even the lazy can survive. I used to see two madmen in Ntungamo – Katukuuza and Kaboogyi. They would go round completely naked but they would not die immediately. In the cold climates, you cannot survive like that. In the Tropics, you die slowly and without drama. By not dying dramatically, however, it does not mean that the Ugandans’ quality of life is good; not at all. How do we measure this? We have a number of measurements such as: the infant mortality rate; the average life-expectancy; the percentage of people with stunted growth; etc.etc. Infant mortality rate in Uganda was 122 per every 1,000 infants born alive in 1986. It has now fallen to 43 per every 1,000 infants born alive within the 1st year of life. In Sweden, however, the infant mortality rate is 3 in every 1,000. The average life expectancy in Uganda was 43 years in 1986. It is now 63 years. In Japan, however, it is 86 years. In Finland it is 81 years. Therefore, this abstaining from modernisation has got a cost to the society. Yet, some people refuse to see this.

You get religious people preaching on how “God has called” the deceased. My question is always: “Why does God like to call Africans more than calling the other people e.g. Japanese?” It is not God calling Africans; It is Satan calling them on account of the Africans failing to use the “talents” (in the Book of Mathew 25: 14-30) God gave them.

This inadequate quality of life is on account, in part, to the 68% of our people refusing to get out of the tradition of only producing for the stomach. It is the failure of the leaders that live near these people, to tell them how to improve their lives by going commercial in their production efforts. In 1966, when we confronted the phenomenon of the stagnation of the Banyankore Society, we proposed 4 steps to be taken: step one – stop nomadism. The Banyankore, like the Karimojong, had that additional problem of nomadism that I analysed in the Booklet: “From Obwiriza (grass thatch) to Matafaari”, which captured that campaign. As a result of that campaign, the Banyankore settled down and started fencing their lands and doing semi-modern animal husbandry.

Unfortunately, Amin came in, in 1971 and we had to embark on fighting that lasted 16 years, until 1986.

When I came back in 1986, I found many of the Banyankore settled but still in the phenomenon of only working for the stomach. After some detailed analysis, I proposed 3 steps. Step one, go out of only producing for the stomach and also produce for the pocket (money). Step two, as you work for money, do so with ekibaro (cura, aimair, otita). Step three, once the families have started earning incomes, the new danger is when the head of the family dies and, then, the children descend on the property and destroy it by fragmentation, just like white ants. In step three, we, therefore, de-campaigned inheritance by fragmentation and recommended inheritance by shares (emigabo). In this way, we divide what comes from the property, surplus income, rather than dividing the property. In that way, what the late property owner left will be preserved and it will produce new companies for each of the descendants of the late owner.

On the issue of cura (ekibaro), our recommendation is that for somebody of four acres or less, the following activities are recommended:

Coffee;

Fruits (oranges, mangoes, pineapples, grapes,

apples, straw-berries);

Food-crops;

Pasture for dairy;

Poultry farming for eggs in the backyard;

Piggery in the backyard;

Fish-farming in the periphery of the wetlands

(emiiga), but not in the centre of the wetlands.

Therefore, the aim of my recent campaign is to wake up the sleeping 68% portion of our homesteads to join the transformation efforts. If each of the 8million homesteads of Uganda earned Shs.20million per year, that effort would add an extra US$44bn to our economy. The size of the economy would, therefore, jump to US$74bn by the foreign exchange rate method.

In 1966, before we started the anti-subsistence farming campaign, I had some disagreement with the Banyankore elite. Their view was that the traditional Banyankore could not change. They were “impossible” (tibarikubasika). My question, then, was: “What, then, should we do?” Their answer was: “Obarugyeho”; “okore abyaawe” (“leave them alone; do your own personal things”). I could not believe in this line because I was living with my mother, originally a traditional woman herself, but who had been transformed by the limited Church efforts and oburokore (being saved). She had learnt the hygienic practices of boiling milk instead of drinking it raw; she taught us to abandon the unhygienic Banyankore practice of eating from the same big plate (orusaniya) or a heat – treated (kubabura) banana leaf (olulagala, orureere) in favour of each individual having his own plate, his own cup, his own kyanzi (milk – pot). She had learnt the knitting of sweaters. She could even read the Bible. This was all influence by the two self -sponsored six months’ courses each of oburoonde (baptism and confirmation courses) which, at personal expense and staying with the Katungyis (family friends of my grand-parents), “abroad” at Kinoni (25 miles from Ntungamo). All this was in addition to the great personal discipline of no alcohol, no smoking (okureetsa), no kikaambi (chewing tobacco), no loose living etc. I, therefore, believed that the Banyankore could change; but we had to undertake the efforts. Besides, we had to try.

Recently, I was in the Sub-county of Kanyaryeru. 70% of the homesteads have food security and are in commercial farming with good ekibaro (cura, otita, aimar) of dairy and bananas. In the 9 Villages around Kisozi, the percentage is 85% for the 1,997 homesteads.

How do the 68% move forward, following the present campaign? My answer is that there are already four funds for Wealth and Job creation. These are: the Operation Wealth Creation (OWC) Fund; the Women Fund; the Youth Fund; the Micro-finance fund and the Innovation Fund. This is a total of Shs437.2bn. This money has been there every year, in some cases, even since the year 2001 as NAADS money. The complaints are now that, this money is given to the ones “who already have”. The have-nots do not get. It is the “haves” that access this support. This cannot be a big problem. The big issue is that the money is there. If the routes through which it is passing have a problem, then we shall get better routes.

Besides, we shall add an additional 3 funds: the value addition fund for the 20 zones depending on the locally available raw-materials; the myooga funds; and the leaders’ SACCO fund. We have already supported the youth of Kampala, Rukungiri etc. with metal cutting and bending common-user machine tools, the common-user machines for carpentry etc. We supported some youth with grain-milling and animal feeds’ mixing machines. We are now to aim at the whole spectrum of value addition, area by area. The immediate industry I am about to launch is leather – tanning at Kawumu, Luwero, using the skins of the meat-packers so that Uganda is self-sufficient in leather for shoe-making, making leather-bags, making leather-covered car-seats etc. We shall, then, target the whole spectrum of industries.

There are, then, the myooga. Omwooga (singular) emyooga (plural) are Runyankore words meaning a specialization sector (blacksmithing, carpentry, pottery etc.). We identified the following myooga:

Boda Boda Association;

Women Entrepreneurs’ Association;

Carpenters’ Association;

Salon Operators’ Association;

Taxi Operators’ Association;

Restaurant Association;

Welders’ Association;

Market Vendors’ Association;

Youth Leaders’ SACCO;

PWDs’ Association;

Produce Dealers’ Association;

Mechanics’ Association;

Tailors’ Association;

Media Operators’ Association;

Fishermen’s Association;

The Performing Arts’ Association.

Each of these will have a district-wide SACCO with branches at convenient points (Parish or Sub-county).

These mwooga – specific and district-wide SACCOs may be better than the katogo (mixed grill) ones that were, moreover, numerous and not covering specific geographic areas. These myooga SACCOs will cover all the miscellaneous activities that are not agriculture. Agriculture is still being covered by OWC and Uganda Development Bank (UDB), the latter for the rich. These myooga SACCOs will also cover some of the social groups: Women, Youth leaders, PWDs and some are suggesting the Elders.

The final and also district-wide will be for the elected leaders of the Local Government or the political Parties. Many of these either get no pay or low pay. Yet, they are not allowed to access the other Wealth funds on the grounds that they are leaders. This is not fair, especially, since they use their time for the benefit of the community and, sometimes, they do not have enough time for their own affairs. The leaders SACCO will fill this gap and they should remain members even when they retire.

All this is choo (waking up) from working for the stomach only (tic me cam keken) using Government money. The people of the parish of Rwengaaju, Kabarole, however, demonstrated that you did not have to wait for Government money. As soon as they got my message in the year 2008, they formed their SACCO and raised money from among themselves starting with Shs.3million from 60 members. You can, on this, contact Mr. Richard Nyakana on telephone who is the leader of these farmers and other wealth creation warriors.

I invite all of you to join in this sensitization effort so that our society is transformed. We cannot go on with a society that still accommodates irrational archaic practices in the modern times when the Americans are celebrating 50 years of going to the moon and coming back. It is suicidal.

I thank you.

Yoweri K. Museveni (Gen. Rtd.)

PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF UGANDA

6th August, 2019

Striker Ivan Bogere was in a superb form as Proline FC outwitted Malawi’s Masters Security.

Proline fc players celebrating of one their goals.

Saturday 9th August 2019.

Proline FC 3-0 Master Security FC.

CAF Confederation Cup.

Striker Ivan Bogere scored a hat trick as Proline get a comprehensive 3-0 win over Masters Security Services in the CAF Confederation Cup preliminary round at Lugogo.

This was Proline’s first ever game in the CAF engagements. The 2019 Uganda Cup winners ensured they took advantage ahead of the return leg with a 3-0 win.

Bogere scored his first in th 17 th minute of the game after beating the goalkeeper Chimwemwe Kunkwawa.

Proline FC captain Noordin Bunjo.

He doubled the lead ten minutes in the second stanza when he ran to tap home Ibrahim Ssendi’s ground delivery

The Proline number 10. completed his hat trick after being set up by Ibrahim Wammanah with four minutes to normal time.

Bogere was later substituted for Allan Egaku and subsequently received a standing ovation in the 90th minute.

Bogere do the dance after scoring.

The return leg is slated for 23rd August and the winner on aggregate will face either AS Kigali from Rwanda or KMC from Tanzania.

Proline FC XI;
Matovu Hassan, Bernard Muwanga, Bunjo Noordin (C), Saaka Mpiima, Yusuf Mukisa, Kintu, Ibrahim Wammanah, Bright Anukani, Ivan Bogere, Hakim Kiwanuka.

Masters Security Services FC XI;
Kunkwawa, Chalamanda, Atsiga, Maloya, Kaunda, Dzongololo, Makawa, Sineta, Suwedi, Manyenje, Jinu

East African security chiefs agree on conduct of joint exercise ahead of Ushirikiano Imara 2019

Military heads of delegations from the six East African Community (EAC) partner states have signed a report to confirm the timelines, exercise paper, manning and resourcing of the EAC 12th Edition Command Post Exercise (CPX) code named Ushirikiano Imara 2019 due in November in Jinja, Uganda.

Brig. Richard Karemire, the UPDF spokesperson, confirmed that the report that was jointly developed by the 85 delegates drawn from the military, police, prisons and civilian agencies of the six partner states and EAC secretariat, was signed by Col Gerald Buteera on behalf of the EAC Secretary General, Colonel Gerald Nikuze on behalf of Burundi National Defence Forces, while Colonel SK Saeed signed for Kenya Defence Forces.

Major General Aloys Muganga signed for the Republic of Rwanda and Brigadier General Nhial Arou Nhial signed for South Sudan.

Brigadier General Marianus Mhangama signed on behalf of Tanzania while Brigadier General James Kinalwa signed on behalf of Uganda.

Brig Karemire said the main planning conference maintained the dates agreed during the March 2019 initial planning conference in Kampala, for the conduct of the CPX as November 04 – 17, 2019.

The final planning conference for the exercise will be held on September 24 – 26, 2019 in Uganda.

The conference agreed on the manning levels of the exercise among other issues. The manning levels specifies the respective countries’ contributions to the players in the exercise.

The meeting further adopted the exercise scenario (general idea and general instructions) aimed at exercising East African countries on four contemporary threats affecting the region; counter-piracy, counter-terrorism, conduct of peace support operations and disaster management in which emphasis was placed on prevailing challenges such as refugee influx, internal displacements, landslides, ebola epidemic among others.

According to the head of mission for the exercise Dr. Sam Omara, the CPX will be conducted in line with the EAC Protocol on Cooperation in Defence Affairs in which partner states agreed to co-operate in military training.

Other areas of co-operation are joint operations, technical co-operation and visits and exchanges to include sports activities among others.

People Power unveils red army.

Hon. Kyagulanyi with some of red army members.

When the People Power leader Robert Kyagulanyi commonly known as Bobi Wine named his coordinating team at his home in Magere Wakiso district on July 24, many were surprised to see prominent faces of people who are staunch members of other parties. The pressure group named at least 24 current MPs in its ranks.

People Power is not a registered political party and the rush by party stalwarts; including from the ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM), to be listed among its leadership has caused many questions. Why would an MP from a well-established party or base in case of independent MPs, rush to join an undefined entity? What is the secret behind the Bobi Wine phenomenon?

Watching them, renowned political analyst Frederick Golooba-Mutebi, arrived at an interesting conclusion. Instead of concentrating on the present he focused on the future. According to him, there are myriad forces pushing these politicians to defect to People Power formally. But there is a likely dilemma that might complicate matters for those concerned and for their parties because People Power might not offer them an institutional home after the elections.

“That might force them to abandon Bobi Wine and return to their parties,” he told The Independent.

According to some analysts, by piling a multi-coloured group of political leaders into an amorphous vehicle and promising to drive them to political success, Bobi Wine is using the same formula as his political mentor, Kizza Besigye.

“He doesn’t believe in structured politics,” one analyst said, “He knows his followers don’t subscribe to a particular political philosophy. All they want is change, good or bad, directed or not.”

This group believes voters still follow individual leaders not parties.  And like Besigye, Bobi Wine wants to create his own following in parliament regardless of their background and political affiliations.

A Bobi Wine supporter told The Independent that “parties are so limiting and some party leaderships are so rigid and gullible that even when it’s obvious that things won’t work, they insist on them.

But questions about whether Kyagulanyi can get the endorsement to become the joint single opposition presidential candidate in 2021 persist. And what are MPs who belong to other parties expected to do when Robert Wine runs for President in 2021 as he has already said he will, especially if their parties have candidates running?

Some analysts spot a negative tendency in the People Power phenomenon, saying it will eventually create confusion and further division within the opposition.  According to this view, the politicians jumping on the Bobi Wine wagon are using Bobi as their donkey, riding on his popularity to win the next election but ultimately jumping off as soon as they reach their destinations.

“These MPs are also stuck,” one analyst explained, “They can’t wish hon. Kyagulanyi away. They have to stand with him in order to be elected or re- elected. No MP who wishes to return to parliament will stand with Mao for example.”

Some observers say these people are not with Bobi Wine because they want him to be President but because they seek to take advantage of his limelight to achieve their individual goals.

Hon. Robert Kyagulanyi’s mentor Kizza Besigye was the first to make similar comments a year ago.  He said as hon. Kyagulanyi plans to run for President, it would be a mistake to rely on the crowds around him.

“The only mistake he can make is to think that he will go into a presidential election and people will elect him to remove Museveni. I know there are people trying to urge him to stand. They tell him you have support here and there, others want to ride on his popularity to become MPs or councilors…” Besigye said in an interview with NBS Television in July last year.

Back then, Bobi Wine’s supporters accused him of attempting to rain on Bobi Wine’s party.

Now, sources say, many of those around Bobi Wine might, in fact, not stick with him up to the end. One analyst predicted that by campaign time in 2020, up to 40% of People Power politicians will have ditched Bobi Wine.

“These people don’t care about who becomes President,” he said, “They care about their own political careers. They will stand with Bobi as long as they believe he will give them political capital to become MPs or councilors or whatever else they aspire to be. Many of them are looking for a way to parliament or to earn a living. Those whose constituencies don’t subscribe to Bobi will eventually fall off.”

Then of course, there is the question of what Bobi Wine would do with the presidency, if he wins it. It is a sign of his chances that this is now being debated seriously. Many people, including People Power diehards, openly discuss Bobi Wine’s inexperience. They say he is an amateur who cannot govern if elected.

Fufa Connect, training for Beach Soccer Clubs kicks off at Fufa SIGs offices, Lungujja.

FUFA ICT Instructor Mr. Kazoora while teaching at Lungujja.

The Fufa Connect, training for Beach Soccer Clubs has opened on Monday 5th August 2019 at Fufa SIGs offices, Lungujja.

The course intended to train club officials with latest club licensing system as required by fufa. A three days training is facilitated by Fufa ICT official Mr. Kazoora.

The course has been officially opened by vice Chairman UBSA Mr. Sseguya Peter who called on clubs to adapt with the modern changes in soccer management.
“UBSA is keen at developing the sport by being dynamic, a lot of changes have been put in place by FUFA , its therefore upon beach soccer clubs to move with the same speed. This training will enable teams to be able to register their players and officials on the FUFA connect system and also solves the players transfer sagas that previously been creating disorder among clubs”. said Seguya Peter.


The training will end on Wednesday 7th August and will be closed by FUFA vice president Mr. Darious Mugoye. Participants must take this course seriously. A number of participants have turned up for day one. Among them includes the following:

1. Nassejje Faridah ( Kiringente BSC)

2. Lukyamuzi Moses (Isabeti BSC)

3. Ssali Musa (Real Galacticos Kyaddondo BSC)

4. Katende Badru( Entebbe Sharks )

5. Ssenfuma Timothy (Mutoola Beach)

6. Ssebagala Tonny (Buganda Royal Institute)

7. Sseguya Peter (St. Lawrence university)

8. Nakaziro Daisy (Mutesa 1 Royal University)

9. Ndyamuhaki Isaac (St. Lawrence university)

10. Walugembe John (St. Lawrence university)

11. Joshua Kashaija (KIU)

12. Khassim Nasri ( Real Galacticos Kyaddondo)

13. Lukoki Joshua (MS Sand Lions)

14. Kenneth Ayella A (Mubs)

15. Kimbugwe Hillary (Mubs)

16. Ssemwogerere Jamil Mukiibi (MS Sand Lions)

17. Kato Adam (Mubs)

18. Mutebi Julius (Kiringente).

Proline fc strengthens their squad, signs Leku Alfred from Jwanege Galaxy.

Leku during a drum game

Poline FC signs Leku Alfred from Botswana Premier League side Jwaneng Galaxy ahead of CAF Conderations Cup debut match.

The giant striker has previously featured for Vipers SC, Onduparaka FC, Express FC and Extension Gunners of Botswana.

Leku during Vipers time.

He is remembered for scoring the memorable goal against Masavu fc away at Bugonga in May last year which secured Express FC from being relegated from premier league during the 2017/18 season.

The former St Joseph Layibi, Kibuli SS and St.Mary’s Kitende forward joins Bernard Muwanga, Diego Hamis Kiiza, Yusuf Mukisa, Andrew Isiagi Okiring, Sula Sekamwa and Shatif Magoola as the tries to boost squad to avoid relegation.

Proline will host Malawi’s Masters Security Services FC in the first leg of the CAF Confederation Cup preliminary round on Saturday 10th August at KCCA Stadium Lugogo at 4:00pm.

Beach soccer clubs to undergo FUFA-connect training.

beach soccer league action.

In the efforts to develop the game of beach soccer further, all the beach soccer clubs will to undergo a three day FUFA-connect training.

This is aimed at capturing the beach soccer clubs and players data onto the FUFA system.
The training will commence on Monday 5th August at FUFA SiGs offices, Lungujja. Each club is supposed to send two people for the training, failure to do so means that club will no longer be a full member of UBSA.

After the training, clubs will therefore be expected to do the online player registration and submit to FUFA.
“For the 2019/2020 season, its the obligation of the clubs to put their players on the FUFA-connect system for player registration and licensing purposes,” remarked Ms. Sarah Birungi, is the UBSA competitions secretary. For any club that will not send the official for this training will lose out seriously.
The training will be conduct by the FUFA Expert Mr. Kazoora. All beach soccer clubs both Men & Women must ensure that they comply with these licensing requirements as set by the mother Federation.
During the beach soccer clubs interface with the beach soccer executive, a number of requirements for a club to be accepted to play in the league this season were explained to them. FUFA-connect will benefit the clubs more as it will regulate the players transfer process and clubs must utilize it, as one of the sources of revenue since no more free release of players from one club to another.
The training will commence on Monday 5th August and end on Wednesday 7th August 2019. Time will be 9:00 am for all the three days.

Participants are encouraged to carry along themselves with Laptops and must have some computer knowledge.
“While speaking to MS News UG, Mr. Tumwesigye Anthony UBSA head of competitions sternly stated that “no turning back this season. We must go FUFA connect for the benefit of all stakeholders.

“Any team not ready for this change will not be registered for the 2019/20 beach soccer season”. he added.
The Beach Soccer League Kicks off on Sunday 1st September 2019 with Men’s league fixtures. Competition venues were maintained as Lido Beach Entebbe and Mutoola Beach Resort Namuzikiza, Mpatta sub-county, Mukono district.